Facebook Working On Brain-controlled AR Devices

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Close on the heels of Elon Musk announcing Neuralink a couple of weeks ago; Facebook is developing a Brain-computer Augmented Reality (AR) interface device (BCI) that would help users type with their mind.

Yesterday, Facebook published a long break-down of the latest studies on BCIs (brain-computer interface) as a means of controlling future Augmented Reality interfaces.

The article coincides with a research paper on Facebook-funded by the UCSF released journal Nature Communications, “Real-time decoding of question-and-answer speech dialogue using human cortical activity.”

These research elements have somewhat human origins as BCI technology could help individuals with conditions like ALS (or Lou Gehrig’s) that can no longer interact naturally with their bodies.

The UCSF team was able, in real-time and in the first place in the field of BCI research, to decode a small group of words and phrases from brain activity.

In their task, however, they can translate much greater vocabulary at dramatically reduced error rates. The scientists stress that their algorithm is the only capability to recognize a tiny group of words and words.

“The promise of AR lies in its ability to seamlessly connect people to the world that surrounds them and to each other. Rather than looking down at a phone screen or breaking out a laptop, we can maintain eye contact and retrieve useful information and context without ever missing a beat,”

Facebook

In the brink of the next major wave of human-based computer technology, the mixed AR and RV systems converge and revolutionize how we communicate with the globe around us, as the chief scientist, Michael Abrash, and his Facebook Realities Labs team see.

“It is going to be something completely new, as clean a break from anything that has come before as the mouse / GUI-based interface was from punch cards, printouts, and teletype machines,”

Michael Abrash

The goal of the BCI research programme, which takes place in the Facebook Reality Labs, is to create a non-invasive, silent voice interface that allows individuals to enter just the phrases they want to say— one technology which could be a strong input for all-day wearable AR lenses.

In 2017, Facebook first announced the creation of a computer-brain interface in its Building 8 study laboratory.

The Facebook program follows Elon Musk’s bold Neuralink study that has unveiled small brain “threads” in a long-lasting, home usable chip, and the capacity to substitute cumbersome equipment now used as brain-machine interfaces.

Author

Anirudh Muley
Anirudh Muley
Anirudh is the Editor in Chief and Main Writer at Clickdotme. He does not like describing himself in the third-person and had a hard time coming up with these two sentences!
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