Google Chrome to Block ‘CPU Heavy Ads’ By Default

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Google has a new feature that would allow Chrome to block resource-intensive ads by default.

Internally, the search giant calls the new “Heavy Ad Intervention” feature to restrict “heavy ads” that often influence your Web browsing experience.

The new developments are particularly emerging in the middle of the continuing changes to limit third-party ad blockers on Chrome.

The modifications are scheduled through the Manifest V3 standard, which plans to replace the current WebRequest API by the new DeclarativeNetRequest API and seeks to regulate browser extension Ad blocking capability.

Google is developing a Heavy Ad Implementation according to a fresh Chromium commit, which is presently intended to block advertisements with bandwidths over 4 MB or consume a CPU for at least 60 seconds.

“This intervention unloads ads that are in the 0.1 per cent of bandwidth usage, 0.1 per cent of CPU usage per minute, and 0.1 per cent of overall CPU time,” described Google Engineer John Delaney, in the commit, as the last updated on June 28, “Work in Progress.”

Instead of merely blocking resource-intensive advertisements, the slated Chrome feature advises users with a specific notification and lets users know more about the procedure via a “Details” button as reported by 9to5Google.

The notification also states that because of its high resource consumption, the specific advertisement has been blocked.

The commit definitely confirms the tech giant is serious about advertisements placing a great deal of burden on system resources.

In fact, the scheduled feature will not block every irritating ad on your browser. To achieve such an experience, you still need a specific ad blocker.

Google, however, has its Manifest V3 standard underway so far that third-party Chrome blockers are supposed to be restricted.

The new standard is designed to substitute the current WebRequest API by the DeclarativeNetRequest API to restrict browser extension ad blocking capacities.

The new standard is designed to substitute the current WebRequest API by the DeclarativeNetRequest API to restrict browser extension ad blocking capacities.

Extension developers were not happy with Google concerning the restrictive API, though it lately insisted that instead of “killing ad blockers” altogether, it wants to “make them safer.”

Author

Anirudh Muley
Anirudh Muley
Anirudh is the Editor in Chief and Main Writer at Clickdotme. He does not like describing himself in the third-person and had a hard time coming up with these two sentences!
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